Rickford Grant & Phil Bull – Ubuntu for Non-Geeks - A Review

Considering myself a Linux-user rather than a power-user or even a Linux-Geek, I thought, I could pick up some tricks from this book. But to make it short: I was disappointed. At first I thought that maybe I just wasn’t part of the target audience and that the book was a little bit mislabelled with “Ubuntu for the computer illiterate” being a more appropriate title. The authors describe at length all the useless stuff on how to make your system as unusable as possible with changed colors, fonts, wallpapers, custom icons for each and every folder or application. While being boring or at it’s best repetitive. “Open the Ubuntu Software Center, Search for this, provide your password when asked, you find your new application here.” - “Open the Ubuntu Software Center, Search for that, provide your password when asked, you find your new application here.” - “Open the Ubuntu Software Center, Search for something else, provide your password when asked, you find your new application here.”

Then they explain how one can use Ubuntu to surf the internet (“Open the Ubuntu Software Center, Search for this, provide your password when asked, you find your new application here.”), play music (“Open the Ubuntu Software Center, Search for this, provide your password when asked, you find your new application here.”), watch DVDs (“Open the Ubuntu Software Center, Search for this, provide your password when asked, you find your new application here.”) or play games (your guess).

But the final straw came, when they called Java “the mother of all scripting languages” and stated that a JAR-file was “what a Java script is called”. That’s where I stopped reading and tossed it in the bin, skipping the chapters about security, where I’d be most likely be told to open the Ubuntu Software Center, search for clamav, provide my password when prompted and look for my new anti-virus solution at some place or the other, using dual boot or sharing files with Windows computers and some other reasons to open the Ubuntu Software Center, search for something, provide my password when prompted and find my new application somewhere.

This book was a complete waste of money, time, paper and ink and I pity the trees that left their lives to print this.

Link (just in case): Rickford Grant & Phil Bull – Ubuntu for Non-Geeks